Fantasy candylandThe world lost a bit of it’s laughter with the recent passing of Gene Wilder. Besides his portrayals of Leo Bloom in The Producers,  the Waco Kid in Blazing Saddles and Dr. Frankenstein in Young Frankenstein, he will always be remembered for his title role in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (based on the book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl).

The plot revolves around five children who have each found a golden ticket providing a tour of the factory and a lifetime supply of chocolate.  Each child represents a distinct personality that can be compared to a money personality type.  When put in the context of real life, see if you know anyone who portrays familiar traits.

Veruca Salt: The consummate spoiled child whose demands outstretched her father’s ability to satisfy—it was all about NOW.  The Veruca Salt money personality sees no consequences, no boundaries and cannot accept “no” for an answer and hold a sense of entitlement without reason. Unless someone has almost unlimited wealth, this demeanor can spell financial disaster because “I see it—I want it” rules his or her decisions.  There are no consequences to actions taken and a clear disconnect from life’s rules.

Violet Beauregarde: A constant barrage of talking with a very distinct lack of desire or ability to listen. She could be named Violet “Dis-regard,” as she was unwilling to listen to words of caution or advice.  The Violet Beauregarde type doesn’t accept advice. It’s impossible to hear when one’s mouth is so totally engaged. This behavior typically results in making the same mistake countless times.  You might see this kind of behavior with people who have been burned countless times in the stock market trying to pick stocks.

Augustus Gloop: The ultimate consumer, especially when food was on the menu, he was all about more, more and more.  Gloop was too busy to focus on anything other than satisfying an addictive personality. In the case of young Augustus, the drug of choice was food. In the real world, it could be drugs, sex, fame, toys or even money. The goal is to satisfy the urge without thought or consideration of consequences.

Mike Teevee: Disconnected from reality, a spectator, more interested in living in an altered reality. You might call this personality type an “avoider.” This type of person will get lost in a myriad of interests, endeavors and excuses to avoid having to get serious and deal with life issues that impact financial success and personal happiness.

Charlie Bucket: Responsible and purpose-driven with a strong dose of “worrier.” His focus was to help his family, while a near-depression mentality was softened by having goals and discipline to bring dreams to reality. This personality type possesses strength that is fueled by clearly defined values.

In examining your money life and what motivates your decisions and actions, can you determine which personality type best describes you?

After a little thought, you might see bits and pieces of various characters in your behavior and personality. Find your inner-Bucket and hold on tight. Our “Bucketness” is the part that has a deep conviction and grounding into what is truly important in life.  That is well worth nurturing and appreciating.

It would be inappropriate to close without a quick look into the central character that Gene Wilder brought to life in Willy Wonka.  His character personified genius, magic, perseverance, humor, compassion, love, creativity and generosity. It is no surprise that Charlie’s values and responsibility brought him to the ultimate prize.

We can all have some magic in our lives if we base our decisions and actions on our values.  What could be sweeter?

Willy Wonka and Financial Happiness